Whilst cataloguing this book, instead of putting in a 500 field to note the book includes an index, I did in fact write: 

Includes incest.

Strictly speaking, still a valid note, but I think I really ought to get some quality sleep some time soon.

computer facepalm

A free public library is a revolutionary notion, and when people don’t have free access to books, then communities are like radios without batteries. You cut people off from essential sources of information — mythical, practical, linguistic, political — and you break them. You render them helpless in the face of political oppression.
One day I’m going to be….. a pirate. Or a librarian. They both run around, like, doing strange things that nobody else can see, until suddenly [screams and flails arms wildly] AHA!!!!….. and then you know. Either a pirate or a librarian has been here, and it’s good. So good. Better. I like that. That’s what I want to be.
Bright Lights Banish Romance in the Library:

British Library visitors were pleased to see new lights installed in the Humanities Two section, illuminating the Asian and African Reading Room’s darkened corners. But the change may disappoint some. A 2005 article in The Spectator identified the section as prone to amorous encounters: “The air in Humanities Two is thick with the smell of books and the intimacy of thought. The hush of the carpet, the whisper of a turned page. Hands reach up to stretch, stroke foreheads, tug hair, slip out of a cardigan; readers emerge from thought and stare intently at one another.”
Library representatives were unaware of the extra-curricular activity. “To our knowledge, this is not the reason the lighting was changed,” they said. There is a precedent. The London Library’s creaky lift used to ascend slowly enough for a frisson. According to a friend.

I think my favourite bit is library representatives were unaware of the extra-curricular activity /titter titter/
The 2005 article quoted is called Reading for Pleasure and available on The Spectator Archive - worth a read (if you feel like some more tittering). 

Bright Lights Banish Romance in the Library:

British Library visitors were pleased to see new lights installed in the Humanities Two section, illuminating the Asian and African Reading Room’s darkened corners. But the change may disappoint some. A 2005 article in The Spectator identified the section as prone to amorous encounters: “The air in Humanities Two is thick with the smell of books and the intimacy of thought. The hush of the carpet, the whisper of a turned page. Hands reach up to stretch, stroke foreheads, tug hair, slip out of a cardigan; readers emerge from thought and stare intently at one another.”

Library representatives were unaware of the extra-curricular activity. “To our knowledge, this is not the reason the lighting was changed,” they said. There is a precedent. The London Library’s creaky lift used to ascend slowly enough for a frisson. According to a friend.

I think my favourite bit is library representatives were unaware of the extra-curricular activity /titter titter/

The 2005 article quoted is called Reading for Pleasure and available on The Spectator Archive - worth a read (if you feel like some more tittering). 

We must fundamentally change how we view libraries and move from a historical idea of libraries as merely physical repositories to seeing them as an opportunity for proactive community engagement
uispeccoll:

erikkwakkel:

Six books, one binding
Here’s something special. You may remember a blog I posted about dos-à-dos (or “back-to-back”) books. These are very special objects consisting of usually two books, which were bound together at their, well, backs. When you were done with the one book, you would flip the object and read the other. The dos-à-dos book you see here is even more special. Not only is it a rather old one (it was bound in the late 16th century), but it contains not two but six books, all neatly hidden inside a single binding (see this motionless pic to admire it). They are all devotional texts printed in Germany during the 1550s and 1570s (including Martin Luther, Der kleine Catechismus) and each one is closed with its own tiny clasp. While it may have been difficult to keep track of a particular text’s location, a book you can open in six different ways is quite the display of craftsmanship.
Pic: Stockholm, Royal Library. See the full image gallery here.
Update: This post featured on several art and news blogs since it appeared, such as Colossal, Neatorama and Gizmodo.

Reblogging the original.

uispeccoll:

erikkwakkel:

Six books, one binding

Here’s something special. You may remember a blog I posted about dos-à-dos (or “back-to-back”) books. These are very special objects consisting of usually two books, which were bound together at their, well, backs. When you were done with the one book, you would flip the object and read the other. The dos-à-dos book you see here is even more special. Not only is it a rather old one (it was bound in the late 16th century), but it contains not two but six books, all neatly hidden inside a single binding (see this motionless pic to admire it). They are all devotional texts printed in Germany during the 1550s and 1570s (including Martin Luther, Der kleine Catechismus) and each one is closed with its own tiny clasp. While it may have been difficult to keep track of a particular text’s location, a book you can open in six different ways is quite the display of craftsmanship.

Pic: Stockholm, Royal Library. See the full image gallery here.

Update: This post featured on several art and news blogs since it appeared, such as Colossal, Neatorama and Gizmodo.

Reblogging the original.

jothelibrarian:

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a charter from the Royal Exchequer of England, one of a collection of charters at the National Archives. This is one of a series of documents whose digital records are being examined in a joint project, ChartEX, being run by the Universities of York and Brighton. Read more about ChartEx here.
Image source: National Archives via University of York.

jothelibrarian:

Pretty medieval manuscript of the day is a charter from the Royal Exchequer of England, one of a collection of charters at the National Archives. This is one of a series of documents whose digital records are being examined in a joint project, ChartEX, being run by the Universities of York and Brighton. Read more about ChartEx here.

Image source: National Archives via University of York.

Working in libraries, I am a lover of books, music, and anything slightly B-movie. I think Ghostbusters is one of the best movies ever, Black by Pearl Jam is one of the best songs ever and Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte is one of the best books ever. Catwoman is also one of the worst movies that could have been so good, if it wasn't so bloody awful. Sometimes I watch serious things. Not often though.