nprbooks:

It’s William Shakespeare’s 450th birthday! (Well, OK, no one knows the exact day he was born, but devotees have adopted April 23 as the day to celebrate, so we will too.)
To mark the occasion, here are three random things you may not have known about the Bard:
What Do Jay Z And Shakespeare Have In Common? Swagger: As with so many other famous words and phrases, Shakespeare was the first to use “swagger.”
Shakespeare Was A Tax Evader And Food Hoarder: Research suggests that he was prosecuted for evading taxes and for hoarding grain during a famine and then reselling it at inflated prices. 
Shakespeare’s Accent: How Did The Bard Really Sound?: A little more Edinburgh — and sometimes even more Appalachia — than you might expect. 
HBD, Will!
-Nicole
gif via giphy

nprbooks:

It’s William Shakespeare’s 450th birthday! (Well, OK, no one knows the exact day he was born, but devotees have adopted April 23 as the day to celebrate, so we will too.)

To mark the occasion, here are three random things you may not have known about the Bard:

HBD, Will!

-Nicole

gif via giphy

from nprbooks

muspeccoll:

hedendom:

Galdrakver (‘Little Book Of Magic’)

The ‘Little Book Of Magic’ is a seventeenth-century Icelandic manuscript, written on animal skin and containing magical staves, sigils, prayers, charms and related texts.

It is known to have once been owned by Icelandic Bishop Hannes Finnson who was alive from 1739 until 1796 and known for having a vast library containing many volumes of magic related texts and manuscripts.

Full manuscript here.

If you’ve been following our Hogwarts series, here’s what a real book of magic looks like!

*Gorgeous*.

from muspeccoll
thenewrepublic:

Charlotte Brontë Discovered the Plain Heroine
"Let us not forget, however often people may bore us by repeat­ing it, that she was a great innovator. She discovered the plain heroine. She discovered the frank heroine who some­times told her love."

thenewrepublic:

Charlotte Brontë Discovered the Plain Heroine

"Let us not forget, however often people may bore us by repeat­ing it, that she was a great innovator. She discovered the plain heroine. She discovered the frank heroine who some­times told her love."

from thenewrepublic
nprbooks:

Libraries in many big cities often serve as de facto homeless shelters — a place for people living on the streets to find quiet and warmth — and it can make others, there to just check out books or videos, uncomfortable. 
KQED’s Scott Shafer reports that’s why the San Francisco Public Library has hired a full-time social worker. She spends her days roaming the library floors, keeping an eye out for regulars who look like they could use her help. And sometimes she hires the formerly homeless patrons she’s helped, like Joe Bank, to do outreach under her supervision.

nprbooks:

Libraries in many big cities often serve as de facto homeless shelters — a place for people living on the streets to find quiet and warmth — and it can make others, there to just check out books or videos, uncomfortable.

KQED’s Scott Shafer reports that’s why the San Francisco Public Library has hired a full-time social worker. She spends her days roaming the library floors, keeping an eye out for regulars who look like they could use her help. And sometimes she hires the formerly homeless patrons she’s helped, like Joe Bank, to do outreach under her supervision.

from nprbooks
theparisreview:

“[Shakespeare’s plays] survived as art only because they first excelled as entertainment.”
John Paul Rollert on reclaiming the Bard for the common man.

theparisreview:

“[Shakespeare’s plays] survived as art only because they first excelled as entertainment.”

John Paul Rollert on reclaiming the Bard for the common man.

from theparisreview
valsez:

Poems for $.50 in a small bookstore in San Francisco 

Oh hello eBay. You want me to buy one of these machines? Okay, whatever you say. Take my monies..

valsez:

Poems for $.50 in a small bookstore in San Francisco 

Oh hello eBay. You want me to buy one of these machines? Okay, whatever you say. Take my monies..

from bookpatrol
When people can’t apply for jobs or access government services because they don’t have access from home, public libraries must be there for them,” said Linda Lord, a librarian in Maine. “Where else are they going to go? Police station? Town hall? I don’t think so. - Libraries Seek High-Speed Broadband - NYTimes.com (via yahighway)
from munrovian
goodticklebrain:

It’s Shakespeare’s 450th birthday! Let’s celebrate! (Full post here - http://goodticklebrain.com/home/2014/4/23/happy-450th-birthday-shakespeare)

goodticklebrain:

It’s Shakespeare’s 450th birthday! Let’s celebrate! (Full post here - http://goodticklebrain.com/home/2014/4/23/happy-450th-birthday-shakespeare)

from shakespearean

Imaginary Libraries In The City Of London

The ever-ingenious Adam Dant has devised these illustrations, selected from his new book BIBLIOPOLIS, Imaginary Libraries in the City of London, proposing an alternative history for the Square Mile based upon Culture rather than Commerce. With each example, Adam has helpfully given us a photograph of the location today so that we may observe the remaining ‘evidence’ and share his vision of this strangely credible yet entirely fictitious version of the past.

Great blog post.

A free public library is a revolutionary notion, and when people don’t have free access to books, then communities are like radios without batteries. You cut people off from essential sources of information — mythical, practical, linguistic, political — and you break them. You render them helpless in the face of political oppression. -

The wise and wonderful Anne Lamott, who turns 60 today, in Robert Dawson’s altogether fantastic photographic love letter to libraries.  (via explore-blog)

Sing it sister.

(via munrovian)

from munrovian